It’s true that you can fly your own plane into the tiny altiport and lunch at Michelin-starred restaurants, but you can also arrive by coach and enjoy a €4 crepe budget lunch; the restaurants in Courchevel really are that varied. And so is the terrain. Courchevel’s 150km of high altitude, snow-sure, fast-lift-accessed pistes are great for everyone from beginners to experts, plus there’s off-piste to be had too. And if by any chance that’s not enough for you, there’s the rest of the Three Valleys’ enormous 600km of linked terrain to explore.

Courchevel is made up of four villages (five if you count the nearby La Tania), all of them very close together and with ski lifts from their centres. Each has its own distinct feel and differing facilities. The Courchevel shuttle bus links are very good too, so getting around is a breeze. The ski area ranges from the lowest village (1260m) up to 3230m, and much of the resort is ski in, ski out. The poshest village, 1850, has five two-Michelin-starred restaurants, and plenty more places to eat that aren’t exceptional but are expensive. Most of the mountain restaurants are very expensive too – those on a budget should picnic, or eat crepes, pizza or paninis from cafes at the bottom of the slopes instead. With all those villages to choose from, there’s après and nightlife of all sorts.

 

At a glance

Altitude

1850 m - 1260 mm

Piste Area

600km

Lift Pass Price

€245 / 6 days

Nearest Airport

Chambéry (100km)

Beginner slopes

179

Intermediate slopes

111

Advanced slopes

30

Lifts

175

Highest lift

2700m

Lowest lift

1260m

Snow parks

5

Glacier

No

Snowmaking

Yes